Building blocks in soil

The enzymes added to liquid fertilizers play specific roles in soil health:
Cellulase: breaks down cellulose, a complex carbohydrate found in plant cell walls, into simpler sugars that can be used by soil microorganisms.
Lipase: breaks down lipids, or fats, into fatty acids that can be used by soil microorganisms as a source of energy.
Protease: breaks down proteins into amino acids, which can be used by plants as a source of nitrogen.
Urease: breaks down urea, a type of nitrogen-rich fertilizer, into ammonium and carbon dioxide, making the nitrogen in urea more accessible to plants.

By breaking down organic matter and releasing essential nutrients, these enzymes help improve soil fertility, promote plant growth, and increase the overall health of the soil. Additionally, they can help improve soil structure by encouraging the activity of microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, that play an important role in the decomposition of organic matter.

building blocks in soil

What does Cellulase do in the soil?

Cellulase is an enzyme that breaks down cellulose, a complex carbohydrate found in plant cell walls, into simpler sugars. In soil, cellulase acts as a decomposer, breaking down plant matter and other organic material into smaller compounds that can be used by other microorganisms as a source of energy and nutrients. By breaking down cellulose, cellulase helps to improve soil structure and fertility, as well as increase the overall health of the soil.

Cellulase is produced by various types of microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. These microorganisms are essential for maintaining a healthy soil ecosystem, as they play a key role in the decomposition of organic matter and the release of essential nutrients. By breaking down cellulase, these microorganisms help to create a nutrient-rich environment that supports plant growth and other important soil processes.

In summary, cellulase plays a critical role in soil health by breaking down cellulose and improving soil structure, fertility, and overall health. By supporting the activity of decomposer microorganisms, cellulase contributes to a healthy and dynamic soil ecosystem.

What does fatty acids do in soil?

Fatty acids are organic compounds that play an important role in soil health. In soil, fatty acids serve as a source of energy and carbon for microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, that play a key role in the decomposition of organic matter and the release of essential nutrients.

When plant matter and other organic material decomposes in soil, fatty acids are released and can be taken up by microorganisms as a source of food and energy. These microorganisms use the fatty acids to support their growth and metabolism, and in turn, they help to break down the organic matter and release essential nutrients into the soil.

Fatty acids also play a role in soil structure and fertility by promoting aggregation, or clumping, of soil particles. This improved structure can lead to better water infiltration, aeration, and root growth, which are all important factors for supporting healthy plant growth.

In addition, fatty acids have been shown to have antimicrobial properties, and can help to control harmful pathogens in soil. This can improve soil health and reduce the risk of disease for plants growing in the soil.

In summary, fatty acids play a critical role in soil health by serving as a source of energy and carbon for decomposer microorganisms, improving soil structure and fertility, and potentially controlling harmful pathogens.

building blocks in soil

Small size

Dutch product coming soon

These machines have a daily food waste processing capacity of 50 to 250 kilos. 

Medium size

Dutch product coming soon

These machines have a daily food waste processing capacity of 500 to 1000 kilos. 

Large size

Dutch product coming soon

These machines have a daily food waste processing capacity of 2500 to 10000 kilos. 

building blocks in soil for Enzymatic fertilizer

What does amino acids do in soil?

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and play a critical role in soil health. In soil, amino acids serve as a source of nitrogen, phosphorus, and other essential nutrients for plants and microorganisms.

When plant matter and other organic material decomposes in soil, amino acids are released and can be taken up by plants and microorganisms as a source of nutrients. These nutrients support the growth and metabolism of both plants and microorganisms, and help to maintain a healthy and productive soil ecosystem.

In addition, amino acids can also play a role in improving soil structure and fertility. By promoting the aggregation, or clumping, of soil particles, amino acids can improve water infiltration and aeration, which are important factors for supporting healthy plant growth.

Amino acids also play a role in soil nutrient cycling by serving as a source of nitrogen for the nitrogen cycle. In this process, microorganisms break down the amino acids and release nitrogen into the soil, where it can be taken up by plants and used for growth.

In summary, amino acids play a critical role in soil health by serving as a source of essential nutrients, improving soil structure and fertility, and contributing to nutrient cycling processes.

What does ammonium and carbon dioxide do in soil?

Ammonium and carbon dioxide play important roles in soil health and nutrient cycling processes.

Ammonium (NH4+) is a form of nitrogen that is commonly found in soil and is an important source of nitrogen for plants. In soil, ammonium can be taken up by plants directly, or it can be converted to nitrate (NO3-) by soil microorganisms, which is another form of nitrogen that can be used by plants.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a critical component of the carbon cycle and is important for supporting plant growth and other soil processes. In soil, carbon dioxide is taken up by plants through photosynthesis and is used as a source of carbon for growth. Excess carbon dioxide can also be used by soil microorganisms as a source of energy and carbon for metabolism.

Both ammonium and carbon dioxide play important roles in soil nutrient cycling and help to support healthy plant growth and soil health. Ammonium and carbon dioxide can also interact with other soil nutrients and pH to affect nutrient availability and plant growth.

In summary, ammonium and carbon dioxide play critical roles in soil health and nutrient cycling by serving as sources of nitrogen and carbon for plants and microorganisms, and affecting the availability of other soil nutrients.

building blocks in soil

Our Food Composter Partners

Single Use Solutions

A USA based manufacturer of 100% plant-based bottles and caps. The only USDA Bio Preferred approved water bottle in the world.

GS-Green Packaging

A Dutch company specializing in support and consultancy for companies that want to step away from fossil plastic to plant-based packaging.

Custom Enzymes Australia

Custom Enzymes is our reseller for the country of Australia. They are an industry-leading supplier of custom  enzymatic formulations. 

Oakland Lease UK

Oakland lease UK is our partner for own to lease in Europe. They can provide service in 28 different European countries and the USA.

Dimension Funding

Dimension Funding has partnered with BMD to make it more affordable to purchase Bio Materials Digesters in the USA.